CBSHouston

Dr. Phillip Luke Sinitiere

Professor of History

  • Ph.D., University of Houston (History), May 2009
  • M.A., Sam Houston State University (History), May 2001
  • B.A., Sam Houston State University (History), December 1999

 

 Bio

Dr. Phillip Luke Sinitiere is Professor of History at CBS. A long-time Houston resident who grew up in Humble, Dr. Sinitiere holds degrees from Sam Houston State University (B.A., M.A., History) and the University of Houston (Ph.D., History). 

Dr. Sinitiere’s research interests include American religious history, world history, African American religion, and religion in world history. His books, articles, and essays have covered topics on American evangelicalism, Christianity in world history, and race in American religion. 

At both the high school and college levels, Dr. Sinitiere has taught classes in American history, world history, European history, religion in the modern civil rights movement, religion in America, history of Islam, historical memory, global Christianity, world religions, modern America, and speech communications. In recognition of his teaching and service at Second Baptist School, Dr. Sinitiere was a State Finalist for the Preserve America/Gilder Lehrman History Teacher of the Year Award (2008) and won the Joseph B. Whitehead Educator of Distinction Award (2008). At Sam Houston State University, he received a NAACP Faculty Freedom Fighter Award (2009). At CBS, his efforts towards the college’s strategic planning process garnered a Cross-Functional Team Research Award (2013).

During 2010-2011, Dr. Sinitiere participated in the prestigious Seminars @ Calvin program at Calvin College. In 2010, “The Power of Race in American Religion,” led by Michael Emerson (Rice University), examined the dynamics of race and inequality in American religious history. In 2011, “Congregations and Social Change,” led by Gerardo Marti (Davidson College), considered how congregations impact American religious culture. In 2013, Dr. Sinitiere served as the Scholar in Residence at the African American Library at the Gregory School, located in Houston’s Fourth Ward. Co-sponsored by the Center for Engaged Research and Collaborative Learning at Rice University, Dr. Sinitiere’s research fellowship focused on W. E. B Du Bois and the Civil Rights Movement in Texas. In 2015, he participated in the Summer Workshop on African American Texas History (SWATH), sponsored by Texas Southern University.

Outside of the classroom, Dr. Sinitiere organized a public forum on behalf of Sudanese refugees, which included a teacher training workshop on African history (2006). He delivered the keynote address at the SHSU-NAACP annual banquet (2010). He lectured on W. E. B. Du Bois at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst (2009) and at Greater Zion Missionary Baptist Church’s Black History Month services (2009, 2010). He also participated in SHSU’s Hispanic Outreach Initiative as a discussion leader for the Encuentro Film Series (2010). At CBS, Dr. Sinitiere co-led the Faculty Book Club (2012). 

At CBS, Dr. Sinitiere teaches courses on Western Civilization, the history of Christianity, Humanities, and African American religious history.

For Dr. Sinitiere’s personal webpage, click here. Contact Dr. Sinitiere by email: phil.sinitiere@cbshouston.edu

Publications

Books

• Holy Mavericks: Evangelical Innovators and America’s Spiritual Marketplace (NYU Press, 2009), co-authored with Shayne Lee.

•Protest and Propaganda: W. E. B. Du Bois, The Crisis, and American History (University of Missouri Press, 2013), co-edited with Amy Helene Kirschke.

•Christians and the Color Line: Race and Religion After Divided by Faith (Oxford University Press, 2013), co-edited with J. Russell Hawkins.

•Salvation with a Smile: Joel Osteen, Lakewood Church, and American Christianity (NYU Press, 2015).

•James Baldwin: God's Black Revolutionary Mouth, Library of African-American Biography (Rowman & Littlefield, under contract; 2017 publication date expected)

Articles and Essays

• “Catholic Evangelicals and Ancient Christianity,” in Vatican II Forty Years Later: Envisioning the Church of the Future, ed. William Madges (Orbis, 2006), 340-367.

•“Of Borders and Boundaries: World History, World Christianity, and the Pedagogy of Religion,” World History Bulletin 23/1 (Spring 2007): 7-14.

•“From the Oasis of Love to Your Best Life Now: A Brief History of Lakewood Church,” Houston History 8/3 (Summer 2011): 2-9.

•“Of Faith and Fiction: Teaching W. E. B. Du Bois and Religion,” The History Teacher 45/3 (May 2012): 421-436.

•“Preaching the Good News Glad: Joel Osteen’s Tel-e-vangelism,” in Global and Local Televangelism, eds. Pradip Ninian Thomas and Philip Lee (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), 87-107.

•“A Legacy of Scholarship and Struggle’: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Political Affairs of His Twilight Years,” Political Affairs (Summer 2013).

•“Will the Evangelical Church Remove the Color Line?: Historical Reflection on Divided by Faith,” Christian Scholar’s Review XLIII/1 (Fall 2013): 41-63.

•“Introduction” (co-authored with J. Russell Hawkins), in Christians and the Color Line: Race and Religion After Divided by Faith, eds. J. Russell Hawkins and Phillip Luke Sinitiere (Oxford University Press, 2013), 1-11.

•“W. E. B. Du Bois as Print Propagandist” (co-authored with Amy Helene Kirschke), in Protest and Propaganda: W. E. B. Du Bois, The Crisis, and American History, eds. Amy Helene Kirschke and Phillip Luke Sinitiere (University of Missouri Press, 2014), 28-48.

•“W. E. B. Du Bois’s Prophetic Propaganda: Religion and The Crisis, 1910-1934,” in Protest and Propaganda: W. E. B. Du Bois, The Crisis, and American History, eds. Amy Helene Kirschke and Phillip Luke Sinitiere (University of Missouri Press, 2014), 190-207.

•“Epilogue” (co-authored with Amy Helene Kirschke), in Protest and Propaganda: W. E. B. Du Bois, The Crisis, and American History, eds. Amy Helene Kirschke and Phillip Luke Sinitiere (University of Missouri Press, 2014), 241-254.

•“Leadership for Democracy and Peace: W. E. B. Du Bois’s Legacy as a Pan-African Intellectual,” in Leadership in Colonial Africa: Disruption of Traditional Frameworks and Patterns, ed. Baba J. Jallow (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), 202-239.